Homeowner associations are common in Florida subdivisions. Over time, the community can elect members to represent them on the board, effectively taking over usually upon 75% occupancy. Before you run for the HOA board in your neighborhood, there are a few things you should know.

The Educational Community for HOA Homeowners provides some insights into what the job entails. The state governs certain parts of the HOA. It is important for board members to know and comply with those laws. The board adopts then enforces rules for the community since they represent the homeowners collectively.

Fiscal responsibility is another item for which board members should understand. The HOA has a budget that the board sets and uses to maintain the communal property whether that includes a park, a pool or an amenity center. As part of the budget, the board should have a reserve of funds in case of an emergency.

Record keeping is crucial for governing the board. The HOA handles survey plats, election materials, meeting minutes, bylaws, member contact information, regulations, rules, accounting and legal agreements. The HOA cannot discriminate the homeowners and must handle emergencies as they crop up. The board is a representative of the homeowners and is responsible to them for everything they do.

Running for the HOA board is a venture into the sphere of politics. Understanding what the homeowners expect of you can help you determine if running is right for you. This information is for educational purposes only and should not be taken as legal advice.